YouTubers don’t earn their money

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YouTubers don’t earn their money

Photo credit: Storm Wells

Photo credit: Storm Wells

Photo credit: Storm Wells

Photo credit: Storm Wells

Jada Thompson

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America has paved the way for entertainers in the media for decades, and we continue to break barriers as we move further into the future. The most prominent entertainers at the moment that teens and young adults connect with are YouTubers. But, in reality, they are just scammers giving people just enough content to keep them interested.

YouTubers get paid way too much for what they do ⁠— which is close to nothing. They are a bunch of relentless kids who moved out to California and, with dumb luck, make more money than they know what to do with. According to Social Blade and Seventeen, Emma Chamberlain is a YouTuber that vlogs about her day with over eight million subscribers and makes about an estimated $6,000 a day. She makes over $2 million a year through endorsements with companies like Curology and Hollister. David Dobrik, with the help of his “Vlog Squad” friends, has over 13 million subscribers, along with five million from his second account. Dobrik makes an estimated $8 million per year, according to Youtube Society, with his friends doing dumb stuff — from anything stupid to just plain humiliating.

Then there’s the well known PewDiePie, who makes videos ranging from vlogs to podcasts, that makes an estimated amount of over $11 million a year, according to Vlogger Gear. When it comes to subscribers, he has a whopping 101 million and counting, according to SocialBlade. Pewdiepie, despite his many subscribers, has been a source of controversy over the years. According to CNN Entertainment, Disney backed out of a deal with him because he paid two men to hold up a sign that had a racial slur against Jewish people.

Once YouTubers gain a certain amount of recognition through their subscribers, YouTube then allows them to start making money off of advertisements. The more views they get, the more ads get added onto their channel, which means even more money, according to Ars Technica.

Unlike the majority of YouTubers, doctors make an average of $329,000 a year, according to TheStreet. It takes four years to get a bachelors degree, another four years for medical school and, depending on the profession, three to seven years in residency. They go to school for a majority of their lives and I don’t know about you, but I would like the person who is supposed to save my life in any case to get paid more than an 18-year-old YouTuber who drinks seven coffees a day and is #relatable.

The influence YouTubers have on society is truly sickening. The second you go onto any social media platform, one of their faces pops up and, let me tell you, it’s neverending. If I see Emma Chamberlain go on vacation for the fifth time this year, and post photos with the same dry poses as always, just so she can throw it in our faces that she’s on vacation again, I will literally scream.

When David Dobrik and Liza Koshy, who is also a well known YouTuber, broke up, Twitter went up in flames. Girls were crying like they had just witnessed a massacre, all because these two people who give no real contribution to society broke up. A couple years after David broke up with Liza, his vlog buddies made a video about Jason Nash who was also dating another famous YouTuber, Trisha Paytas. In it, they basically said how they made stupid money off the views of the breakup video. They finessed their viewers and they don’t care.

I think it’s safe to say that YouTubers have put pyramid schemes to shame. They’ve basically said “Hello world. We are here to brainwash you and take your money in ways you could never fathom and, even though you know you’re being scammed, you won’t care.”

I’m not saying that all YouTubers are out for your money, because there are YouTubers out there that actually care for their fans and contribute to society. It should be noted that YouTuber Zoella has done charity work for vaccinations for babies in Uganda, mental health, cancer and strokes. YouTubers like Emma Blackery and Carrie Hope Fletcher donated their hair for cancer associations, according to Media.

Since people have learned their way around the system, they have imprinted themselves on everything possible. We’re openly giving them our money for some mediocre content. They’ve already taken over. But, if we all come to our senses, we could bring all their so-called careers down and bring class back to the entertainment world.

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