Since 1923 • For a greater Loyola

The Maroon

Since 1923 • For a greater Loyola

The Maroon

Since 1923 • For a greater Loyola

The Maroon

Black student organizations aim to support BIPOC communities

Laci Barrow

Loyola offers over 130+ student-led organizations, but Black students are forging the way for their peers and their communities at Loyola.

Black Student Union (BSU)

The Black Student Union is an organization that works to meet the needs of the African-American population at Loyola. The goal of BSU is to help not only Black students but other minority students excel and unite. The organization does this by coming up with cultural, educational, and social services that correlate to African-American culture to create a community and further create history. The board of BSU creates new ideas to incorporate in the club, such as continuing old BSU traditions such as Black Student Union Pageant and a Black student study abroad panel. Being able to make students of all different backgrounds feel supported and heard is crucial for BSU. It is important for an organization like this one to exist for Black students to feel supported while attending a predominantly white institution, which only pushes BSU to continue to strive to be a welcoming safe space for all students but especially, Black students.

 

A La Mode

A La Mode is a fashion club chartered up at Loyola back in 2019. The name A La Mode comes from the french term “in fashion.” Their hope is to create a place to show off the creative styles of fashion the students of Loyola have. They do this by using their space on campus as a runway to discuss the newest trends in clothing. A La Mode applies influences from fashion magazines and trends to encourage Loyola students to have fun and take a more personalized approach to fashion.

Lemon Pepper

Lemon Pepper is a club dedicated to looking at life after Loyola, wanting to support individuals on how to steer noninclusive political, professional, and social spaces. President of Lemon Pepper Ari Jackson said, “It’s very important to have people that not only look like you but are like-minded and want to succeed,” she explained. “A lot of us are pursuing degrees in areas that are predominantly white [and] knowing how to navigate those spaces, not just when you’re in college, but once you get out is so important.”
The executive board of LP works hard to support and meet the needs of, not only marginalized groups, but all students who strive for success.

Laci Barrow

Loyola chapter of NAACP

There are more than 2,200 chapters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People around the world, but in 2020, a new chapter made its home at Loyola with the efforts of Brionna Wilcher-Hudson. The goal of Loyola’s chapter of NAACP is to mobilize not only Black students at Loyola but underserved communities in the city. The chapter is also a place for members to hone their executive skills and leadership to prepare them for life beyond Loyola.

L.O.V.E.

Living Our Vision Everyday, is an student-led organization that was adopted at Loyola under the National Association of Colored Women’s Club in 2015. Their goals is to create a safe space of sisterhood for women of color and to create leadership, community skills, and brilliance. L.O.V.E. works to help Black women show off their unique selves while supporting each other. By providing that safe space, it encourages women in the Black community at Loyola to feel connected to one another. One way the club works to help women feel connected is their annual induction ceremony, where they formally recognize the new members of the club.

Caribbean and African Students Association (CASA)

The Caribbean and African Students Association was created in 2021. Their goal is to increase the representation of diversity on campus for others. They aim to create a safe space that feels like home for students of Caribbean or African descent. They do this by holding events that demonstrate Caribbean and African culture with dances, food, panel talks, and music. Caribbean night is one of the many events CASA holds to highlight the beauty, variety of foods, music, and dancing of the Caribbean culture. Holding events like these fosters cultural diversity on campus.

NABJ

The National Association of Black Journalists is an organization of students who are pursuing careers as journalists or media-related professionals. These students come up with quality services and programs to help promote all Black journalists around the world. NABJ works to give special services such as mentoring, training, opportunities for scholarships and internships, and short courses. Being able to bring Black students who want to showcase their passion for journalism and make a name for themselves is what NABJ works toward.

NPHC

The National Pan-Hellenic Council is a council at Loyola made up of the Divine Nine historically Black fraternities and sororities. The Divine Nine organizations carry a standard of commitment for their sisters and brothers through the history of fraternalism. The five that are chartered at Loyola are the: Rho Epsilon Alphas, Eta Theta AKAs, OmiKron Upsilon Nupes, Nu Mu Deltas, and Omicron Metropolitan Zetas. NPHC wants to uplift Black students and give back to their community while building a community themselves through sisterhood and brotherhood.

Laci Barrow

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About the Contributor
Laci Barrow, Photo Editor
Laci Barrow currently serves as The Maroon's Photo Editor. Laci is a junior mass communication major focusing on public relations and minoring in marketing. She loves connecting with her community through the art of storytelling. Outside of the Maroon, you can find Laci scoping out spots to take great landscape pictures and weightlifting. For inquiries, reach out to Laci via email at [email protected]

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